Construction Injuries

According to OSHA, roughly 17.5% of all fatal work related injuries occur in the field of construction. Injured construction workers are entitled to compensation in the amount of their medical bills and the cost of lost hours of work. It can be hard to determine who is at fault for an injury on the job, and companies may try to deny responsibility in order to escape liability and avoid paying damages in addition to worker’s compensation.

At Chicago Personal Injury Attorneys, we believe that being injured on the job causes enough stress and pain on its own and should not be accompanied with an additional financial burden and we work with our clients to collect the most possible on their behalf that we can under law.

construction accidentCommon Construction Accident Injuries

While there are numerous ways construction workers can get hurt, OSHA has reported that three out of five construction related deaths are caused by four types of injuries.

  1. The first of these is falls, which is the most deadly kind of construction injury. Survivors of falls usually have severe fractures that may require surgery to correct.
  2. Being struck by an object is another common cause for severe injury and death. The object could come from a machine or fall as debris from above. Injuries that result from falling or flying objects are often to the head or neck and may be life changing, if not deadly.
  3. Electrical accidents/shock account for many construction worker deaths due to many exposed electrical components on construction sites. The high voltage running through these components presents a constant risk to construction workers who unsuspectingly touch an object that has a current running through it. Many of these injuries result in death.
  4. Being crushed by an object, machine or between objects is the fourth most common deadly construction injury. This can happen when a worker is not aware of another worker’s presence and crushes him or her with machinery. Survivors are normally left with severe injuries that include crushed or shattered bone. A long recovery is required for these injuries, which results in lost wages and high medical bills.

When Worker’s Compensation is Not Enough to Provide For An Injured Worker & Their Family

When an employee is injured, he or she has the right to file a worker’s compensation claim against his or her employer. In many cases, worker’s compensation will not cover all aspects of a work-related accident including: pain and suffering, disability and lost wages.

Workers who are injured on the job are often unaware that they may have the right to file a lawsuit for negligence in addition to a worker’s compensation claim if the accident was caused by the negligent act of third-party company. A construction accident lawsuit can recover damages to pay for medical bills, lost wages, rehabilitation and pain and suffering that goes beyond any recovery available via a work comp case.

A Chicago-based Construction Accident Law Firm With ‘Big Case’ Experience

Chicago Construction Accident Attorneys understand the severity of most construction injuries and the financial impact they have on the families of the injured worker. We will fight hard to ensure that you receive every penny that you deserve in compensation for your injuries or the loss of a loved one. Our experience representing injured tradesmen is second to none. We have successfully represented thousands of workers in both workers compensation and third-party accident lawsuits.

While we are proud of our achievements on behalf of our clients, we are most proud of the fact that our track record of excellence has caught the attention of our peers. Consequently, many of our most serious injury cases come from other attorneys– and even judges whom respect our work so greatly that they trust us with the representation of their friends and family. Why not get the lawyers that other lawyers trust with their own cases?

Call us today to schedule a free consultation and learn more about your legal rights and how to proceed with your case.

Sources:

http://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html
http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/epi/pdf/ERS%2006_05.pdf
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.nr0.htm

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